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Deborah Isemingers Family Tree (Genealogy Site)

Cheroenhaka

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Welcome graphic

~~~All that is essential for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing~~~

Chiefmen Wat Bailey --father to Mary Bailey, 

George Skipper - Mary Bailey 
Chiefmen George Skipper - ?. 
Barnabus Skipper-- ?.
Silas Skipper--- unknown Quick
Arthur Skipper---Nancy Odom. 
Silas Skipper -- Ann ?
Benjamin F. Skipper-- Fanny Bridges. 
Bertha Bell Skipper -- William Bassett. 
Charles Bassett -- Wanda Ruth Parkson.
Cheryl Bassett -- Douglas Iseminger.
Deborah Iseminger.


These same The principal members of the Nottoway and living in present-day Southampton County in 1750 ~~ Sam, Frank, Jack, John Turner, Wat Bailey, and George Skiper  sold Nottoway land in 1769

 

\SOUTHAMPTON CO., VIRGINIA PP. 57-60
AS A COURT FOR THE COUNTYOF SOUTHAMPTON THE TH DAY OF MARCH 1769.
THIS INDENTURE OF MEMORENDUM .... PROVED BY THE ..... OF BENJAMIN CLEMENTS,
BENJAMIN RUFFIN AND CHARLES SIMMONS WHEREFORE HERETO AND ORDERED BY THE
RECORDED.

TASS R/ KELL..., CCB
THIS INDENDURE IMPARTITE MADE THE FIRS DAY OF JANUARY, IN THE OF OUR LORD,
....
..... ... .. . . . .
BETWEEN SAM, FRANK, DOCTOR TIM, JOHN ...., GEO. SCIPER, (SIC)
JACK .... AND WATT BAILEY, CHIEFTEN OF THE NOTTOWAY INDIANS OF THE
FIRST PART JOHN SIMMONS OF SOUTHAMPTON COUNTY, THOMAS, ... AND
BENJAMIN EDWARDS OF THE COUNTY, .... .. .. . . . ... . . . .. SECOND
PART AND BENJAMIN ....., OF THE COUNTY OF SOUTHAMPTON OF THE
THIRD PART. WHEREAS BY ONE ACT OF THE GENREAL ASSEMBLY ORDER
AT A ...... ....... HELD AT WILLIAMSBURG IN THE EIGHTH YEAR
OF THE REIGN OF OUR LORD GEORGE THE SECOND KING OF GREAT
BRITIAN INTITLED AN ACT TO ENABLE THE NOTTOWAY INDIANS TO
SELL CERTAIN LAND THERERIN MENTIONED FOR DISCHARGING (?)
THE INDIAN INTREPRETER IT IS AMONG OTHER THINGS .....
THAT THE CHIEFMEN OF THE NOTTOWAY NATIONS ARE IMPOWERED
TO MAKE SALE OF ALL OR ANY PART OF A CERTAIN ..........
OF LAND TO SIX MILES DIAMETER LYING AND BEING ON THE NORTH
SIDE OF NOTTOWAY RIVER IN THE COUNTY OF ...... BY AND
WITH THE CONSENT OF SAID JOHN SIMMONS THAT ........
BENJAMAIN EDWARDS WHO ARE BY THE SAID ACT APPOINTED .....
ERS TO SEE THE SAID ACT DULY EXCUTED AND AFTER.... AGREEMENT
MADE FOR THE .... OF ANY PART OF THE SAID LAND ... ... ....
DO NOT EXCEED FOUR HUNDRED (?) ACRES TO ANY ONE PERSON ... .. . .. .
MAY BE LAWFULL FOR THE SIAD CHIEF MEN TOGETHER WITH THE .....
TRUSTEES AFORESAID OR THE SUVIVOR OR SUVIVORS OF THEM TO .....
AND DELIVER A ....MENT TO THE PURCHASOR WHO IMMEDIATELY AFTER
TEH EXECUTION WEHERE OF SHALL PAY UPON TO THE CHIEF MEN ....
..... .... ...... TO THE ... .. . . .......... ...,
....... ..... .......
THOMAS ......, LS FRANK ........., LS
BENJ. EDWARDS, LS SAM'L ........., LS
HIS X MARK
WILLIAM ANDREWS JOHN .........., LS
B... RUFFIN HIS X MARK
. . .... GEORGE SKIPPER, LS
HIS X MARK
JACK ........., LS
HIS X MARK
........ ....., LS

HIS X MARK

Rose, Small

Affinities of the Nottoway Language

English                                                                          Nottoway        

 

Creator                                                                        Quakerhunte

Devil (wicked spirit)                                                      Otkum

Man                                                                             eniha

Woman                                                                        ekening

Father                                                                          akroh

Mother                                                                         ena

Husband (one who is married)                                      gotyakun

Wife (I go with it, her)                                                   dekes

Son                                                                              wakatonta

Daughter (she, herself)                                                  eruha

Brother                                                                         kahtahtekeh

Sister                                                                            ahkahchee

Boy                                                                              aqueianha (hakwaieha)

Infant, child                                                                   nahkasehkeh

Chief                                                                            eteshe

Head                                                                            setarake

Hair                                                                              howerac

Ear                                                                               suntunke

Eye                                                                              unkoharac(unkaharak, pl.)

Nose                                                                            oteusag

Mouth                                                                          eskaharant

Tongue                                                                         darsunke

Tooth                                                                           otosag

Neck                                                                            steereke

Arm                                                                             ohnunchahk

Hand (fingers)                                                               nunke

Nails                                                                            yetunke

Belly                                                                             otequahk

Leg                                                                              sanseke

Foot                                                                             saseeke

Toes                                                                             seeke

Heart                                                                            sunhe

Blood                                                                           gatkum

House (hut)                                                                  onuahag

Arrow                                                                          aruntquaserauk

Knife                                                                            osakenta

Moccasins (shoes)                                                        otagwag

Sky (heavens)                                                               quakerwntika

Sun                                                                              aheeta

Moon                                                                           tethrake

Star                                                                              deeshu

Day                                                                              antyeke

Night                                                                            asunta  

Light                                                                             youhanhu

Darkness                                                                      asunta

Morning                                                                       suntetung

Evening                                                                        gensake

Spring                                                                          shautaroswache

Summer                                                                        genheke

Fall (autumn)                                                                thsheke

Winter                                                                          goshera

Lightning                                                                       towatgeheterise

Thunder                                                                        hahenu

Rain                                                                             yountoutch

Snow                                                                           kaukaw

Fire                                                                              auteur  

Water                                                                           awwa

Ice                                                                               owes

Earth (land)                                                                  ahonrach

Sea (ocean)                                                                  ahwowkehoe

River                                                                            joke

Lake                                                                            kahahtahia

Mountain (hill)                                                              newnotehs

Island                                                                           eohtessieh

Stove (rock)                                                                 ohhoutahk

Copper                                                                        geekquan

Iron                                                                              owena

Corn (maize)                                                                ohnehahk

Bread                                                                           gotatera

Tree                                                                             geree

Wood (fire)                                                                  geka

Leaf                                                                             oheahauroch

Bark                                                                             ohseroch

Grass                                                                           oherag

Oak (red)                                                                     coree

Pine tree                                                                       ohotee

Deer                                                                             aquia

Wolf                                                                             huse

Dog                                                                              cheer

Fox                                                                              skeyu

Rabbit (hare)                                                                queru

Snake                                                                           antatune

Bird                                                                              cheeta

Fish                                                                              kaiutu

White                                                                           owheryakun

Black                                                                           gahuntee

Red                                                                              ganuntquare

Yellow                                                                         kateanteharia

Green                                                                           sekate quantiu

Great (big)                                                                    tatchanawihie

Small (little)                                                                  newisha

Strong                                                                          wakasti

Old                                                                              onahahe

Young                                                                          osae

Good                                                                           waquast

Bad                                                                              wassa

Handsome (beautiful)                                                    yesaquast

Ugly                                                                             yesana

Dead (death)                                                                anseehe

Cold                                                                             watorae

Warm (hot)                                                                  tariha

I                                                                                   ee

Yes                                                                              hokeh  

No                                                                               roh

One                                                                              unte

Two                                                                             dekanee

Three                                                                           arsa quaashsa

Four                                                                             hintag

Five                                                                              whisk

Six                                                                               oyag

Seven                                                                           ohatag

Eight                                                                             dekra

Nine                                                                             deheerunk

Ten                                                                              washa

Eleven                                                                          urteskahr

Twelve                                                                         dekane skahr

Twenty                                                                         dewartha

Twenty-one                                                                  dewartha unteskahr

Thirty                                                                           arsenee warsa

One hundred                                                                kaharsthree

One thousand                                                               unteyoasthree

To eat                                                                          untchore

To drink                                                                       ararher

To run                                                                          sarioka

To speak                                                                      wasweke

To see                                                                          waskehe

To love                                                                         tatchadanuste

To kill                                                                           urtatreeyou

To go                                                                           ia

To sleep                                                                       kirtus

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Teak Wood Spinning DNA Model

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King of the Nottowayes
Signe and Tribe
of the Indian representatives
who witnessed the signing of the treaty

Please feel free to Contribute or Correct any misinformation i may have

Diamonds 9
Diamonds 1

Rose, Small
Diamonds 6

feathersedit.jpg
link

This message has been posted already to the Quick and Skipper mailing lists
and to the Richmond-Scotland County discussion group. I think it is an
important enough development to merit distribution on this list as well. I
am also sending a transcribed document, given to me by Verna Quick which
relates to this matter and solidifies even further this remote
Skipper-Quick connection. I am so impressed that the Skippers of early
Richmond (Anson) County can be traced to a refugee and former headman from
the Nottoway Indian tribe of Southampton Co., VA. William Byrd, in his
History of the Dividing Line, mentions visiting a Nottoway Indian village
in the very last days of their existence as a coherent tribe (late 1720's.)
A digest of that encounter is given in Douglas Right's, THE AMERICAN INDIAN
IN NORTH CAROLINA (91-2.)

"The name of this latter tribe (the Nottoway) signified "snakes" or
"enemies" in their language (that of the Meherrin), and the name applied to
them by the coastal tribes, Mangoac, was the general name for the Iroquois,
meaning "stealthy ones," frequently written Mingo.

"A runner was dispatched to the Nottoway Town, on the river of that name,
to announce the visit of the surveyors. The women of the village had been
posted on a hill to watch for the visitors, and greeted them with
vociferous whoops. At this signal the chief men of the place came out and
escorted the party into the fort, a palisade about ten feet high, leaning
outwards slightly to make scaling difficult. Each side of the square was
about one hundred feet long; loopholes were set at intervals. Within the
enclosure were huts made of saplings covered with bark. Furniture
consisted of frames covered with mats or deer skins.

"The young men, who had painted themselves in hideous manner, entertained
with war dances. Music was furnished for the dancing by means of an Indian
drum fashioned out of a gourd with a skin stretched across the mouth. The
women were dressed in red and blue coats made of cloth bought from traders,
and their hair was beaded with white and blue shell beads. However, the
charm of their attire was nullified because "the whole Winter's dirt was so
crusted on their Skins, that it requir'd a strong appetite to accost them.'
Firearms were in general use, only the small boys handling bows and
arrows. The population of the town was about two hundred, and they were
said to be the only Indians of any consequence then living in Virginia.
Their rapid decline was attributed chiefly to disease and rum.

"...The Indians provided corn for the surveyors' horses and received in
turn what rum was left over from the night's sojourn. The exchange was
evidently satisfactory to the Nottoway, as we are told that they loved rum
'better than they do their wives and children.' Baskets made of silk grass
were offered by the women and such offerings being looked upon with
suspicion by their visitors, who regarded and Indian present as 'a
liberality put out to Interest, and a bribe placed to the greatest
advantage.' At the departure of the guests, the braves of the village
fired a salute in their honor."

George Skipper was probably a grown man at the time this visit would have
taken place. His supposed son Barnabus is now believed to have been the
father of Elizabeth Quick and ancestor to many Quicks in Marlboro County.
When I think of the Quick stories about my great grandfather Moses, and the
quantities of brandy and whiskey appearing in the estate sales of Burwell
and Solomon Quick, I realize that alcohol consumption and abuse among mixed
race individuals probably has a long history, stretching back to the days
when white traders began selling rum and firearms to Indians for hides.
Then, too, the violent streak noted in many of these families may take its
origins in Native American resentment toward a larger alien culture
crowding out its own and driving all before it--not to mention the
traditional importance of warfare in Amerindian culture even before white
contact. Somehow, it helps to know that two basically negative traits I
have noticed in twentieth century relatives has a historical context.
Larry Cates

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William Byrd II account of the Nottoways

The Iroquois, National Traits of Character

Captive's Life Among Indians

Creation Origin of the Continent, the Animal, and of the Indian

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Teak Wood Spinning DNA Model

Nottoway County was first inhabited by native American Indians of the Iroquoian nation tribe called Nadowa. The Nadowa lived along the County’s only river and the name of their tribe became associated with the area they inhabited. This name was Anglicized with the coming of English settlers to ‘Nottoway’.

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IROQUOIAN INDIAN FAMILY HISTORY

: The case of anthropologists and Virginia Indians

Image Preview

NOTTOWAY RIVER

 
 

 

NOTTOWAY STORIES,

In the western part of the county, now Southampton county, there was another tribe, called the Nottoways, who were identified with our earliest history. They were intimately connected with the white settlers, and for more than one hundred years lived on their own lands, bartered the products of their hunting and fishing with the white people for guns, blankets, etc., sold to them their lands, and, except for their fondness for rum, seem to have been a peaceful and well disposed people, more sinned against than sinning. For in 1752 the General Assembly of Virginia passed an act declaring "that if any person or persons shall hereafter, under any pretense whatever, take from the Indians any of their guns, blankets or other apparel, such persons so offending shall pay to the Indian or Indians so injured the sum of twenty shillings for every such offense; and if the offender be a slave, he shall receive, for such offense, on his or her naked back, twenty-five lashes, well laid on." But generally the Indians were treated with the greatest kindness until the time of the great Indian massacre, in 1622, for the colonists were thoroughly imbued with idea of converting them to Christianity.

Instructions to such as shall march upon Discoveries

Being arrived at a town, enter no house until you are invited; and then seem not afraid to be led in pinion'd like a prisoner: for that is a ceremony they use to friends and enemies without distinction.

You must accept of an invitation from the seniors, before that of the young men; and refuse nothing that is offered or set before you: for they are very jealous, and sensible of the least slighting or neglect from strangers, and mindful of revenge
http://www.ls.net/~newriver/va/eta.htm#2

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These remnants were the amalgamation of some of the numerous tribes that had roamed the forests of Virginia. The Nottoway, strong during the first settlement period and greatly outnumbering the Powhatan in the provincial census of 1669, were by 1820 reduced to 27 persons, of whom only three spoke the tribal language. The Meherrin, the other Virginia tribe of Iroquoian stock, equaled in number the Pamunkey-originally the strongest tribe of the Powhatan confederacy--in 1699, after which they rapidly vanished. The Nansemon (tribe of the Powhatan confederacy, composed of some 300 warriors in 1622, had dwindled to 45 men by 1669. In 1744 they joined the Nottoway. Today, in Virginia, there are several groups and scattered families of Indian descent, comprising 779 persons. The State recognizes three tribes: the Pamunkey, the Mattaponi, and the Chickahominy.

 

Nottaway. Meaning "adders," in the language of their Algonquia neighbors, a common designation for alien tribes by peoples of
that linguistic stock.

The Nottaway belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family, their closest connections probably being the Meherrin, Tuscarora, and Susquchanna.

There Location was n the river of the same name in southeastern Virginia.

The Delawares gave them the name Mingwe. The northern and western Algonquians called them Nadowa, 'adders'. The Powhatan called them Massawomekes. The English knew them as the Confederation of the Five Nations, and after the admission of the Tuscarora in 1722, as the Six Nations. Moreover, the names Maqua, Mohawk, Seneca, and Tsonnontowan, by which their leading tribes were called, were also applied to them collectively. The League of the Iroquois, when first known to Europeans, was composed of the five tribes, and occupied the territory extending from the East watershed of Lake Champlain to the west watershed of Genesee river, and from the Adirondacks southward to the territory of the Conestoga. The date of the formation of the league is not certain, but there is evidence that it took place about 1570, occasioned by wars with Algonquian and Huron tribes. The confederated Iroquois immediately began to make their united power felt. After the coming of the Dutch, from whom they procured firearms, they were able to extend their conquests over all the neighboring tribes until their dominion was acknowledged from Ottawa river to the Tennessee and from the Kennebec to Illinois rivers and Lake Michigan. Their westward advance was checked by the Chippewa; the Cherokee and the Catawba proved an effectual barrier in the south, while in the north they were hampered by the operations of the French in Canada. Champlain on one of his early expeditions joined a party of Canadian Indians against the Iroquois. This made them bitter enemies of the French, whom they afterward opposed at every step to the close of the French regime in Canada in 1763, while they were firm allies of the English. The French made several attempts through their missionaries to win over the Iroquois, and were so far successful that a considerable number of individuals from the different tribes, most of them Mohawk and Onondaga, withdrew from the several tribes and formed Catholic settlements at Caughnawaga, St Regis, and Oka, on the. St Lawrence. The tribes of the league repeatedly tried, but, without success, to induce them to return, and finally, in 1684, declared them to be traitors.

 

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In 1714, Ouracoorass Teerheer of the Nottoway signed another treaty, this one between only one tribe and the crown. The treaty promised the tribe a protected reservation in exchange for a yearly tribute, the learning of Christianity and a warning of any other tribe's planned attacks on white settlers.
They were given two pieces of land, one described as a circle with a radius of three miles, on the north side of the Nottoway River. The other parcel was a square, six miles on every side, south of the river. Here the Nottoway retreated, and here they found the going rough.
Today, the river water is as much as 20 feet deep in some particularly good fishing spots. The remnants of an Indian fish weir are still there, largely hidden below the surface.
The cypress trees that line the river banks are estimated at 1,000 years old, far older than the reservation

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Governor Spotswood, hoping to put an end to the warfare between the Iroquois and the southern tribes, in 1722 promoted the Albany (N.Y.) Conference, at which a peace treaty was signed by the Five Nations of the Iroquois and their allies, the Tuscarora, Shawnee, and others on the one hand, and by Virginia and its tributary Indians on the other. Thus the long war ended and peace finally came in Virginia to 'the Nottoways, Meherrins, Nansemonds, Pamunkeys, Chichominys, and the Christanna Indians'-called 'Todirich-roones' by the Iroquois

Patriot Chiefs and Loyal Braves; S. Pony Hill

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The North and South Carolina border became a favored haunt as early as the 1730’s. In addition to the Saponi “retired out of Virginia to the Cattawbas” a band of Cheraw brokered a deal with Welsh Baptist settlers from Delaware for land in present-   day Marlboro County. And

a large group of Nottoway, numbering about 300, was reported on “the northern frontiers of South Carolina between 1748 and 1754.”

Between 1734 and 1756 the Nottoway had been so reduced by "the want of the common necessaries of life, sickness, and other casualties" that the Virginia Legislature allowed them to sell a total of 18,000 acres of their land in Southampton County They used land sales and leases to support themselves.

 George Skiper, born say 1720 ,   "One of the Chief men of the Nottoway Indian Nation"

 On February 1, 1749/50, purchased 200 acres in Anson County, North Carolina, on the north side of the Pee Dee River   

On February 2, 1749 , sold his land in Southampton County, Virginia

The principal members of the Nottoway and Nansemond living in present-day Southampton County in 1750 were:  Sam, Frank, Jack Will, John Turner, Wat Bailey, and George Skiper

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In 1757, the Virginia governor at Williamsburg received a delegation of Indians including "King Blunt and the thirty-three Tuscaroras, seven Meherrins, two Saponies and thirteen Nottoways.  

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 Barnabus and his family to move into South Carolina. In
March and October of 1793, Barnabus sold his 1500 acres of land on
Solomon's and Mark's Creek and in 1800, he along with JOhn and Silas
Skipper appear in Marlboro County,

 Bishop Gregg's HISTORY OF THE OLD CHERAWS reveals an unexpected fact
concerning the Skippers. Describing the Revolutionary conflict between
Tories and Patriots--the desperate and bloody partisan warfare which
gripped the Carolina backcountry-- he says:

"On the eastern side of the river (the Pee Dee,) near the dividing line
between Richmond County, and what is now Marlborough District, lived two
young men, named Skipper, of mixed blood, but peaceable and inoffensive.
They had taken parol, however, and for no other offence, were seized by the
Whigs on both sides of the line and hung. Such a course was well
calculated to excite a feeling of bloody retaliation and thus the murderous
conflict continued."

These have to be representatives of the group of Skippers I was talking
about--in fact, I think it may have been George, Jr. and Samuel who were
hung. Samuel is known only through a single land grant (1778/79) and
George is only suggested by the 1763 tax list. Neither appear in later
records. From this and other statements in Gregg's book, it would appear
that many of the "Redbones" or peoples of mixed blood of the Pee Dee basin
including the Skippers and some of the Brigmans and others, took up the
Loyalist cause during the Revolution. Perhaps they did so because they
bore grudges against white patriot neighbors who looked down on them and
discriminated against them. The Skipper boys took a parole and agreed not
to continue their fighting, and Gregg suggested that they were killed more
because of their race than because of their history as Tories. Their
deaths became a cause celebre among other mixed race peoples and Tories
generally and excited another bloody wave of recrimination.

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Treaty Between Virginia And The Indians 1677

The Saponi, or, as they were then commonly called, the Christanna Indians, were still at war. Quarrels persisted between them and the neighboring Nottoway and Meherrin; while the more distant Iroquois, who cherished toward these people 'so inveterate an enmity' that it could be 'extinguished' only by their 'total Extirpation,' continued their attacks.

. In 1823, the Cherokee leader John Ridge, a man of considerable wealth, supplied out of his own experience this scornful definition of racial oppression of the Indian:

An Indian...is frowned upon by the meanest peasant, and the scum of the earth are considered sacred in comparison to the son of nature. If an Indian is educated in the sciences, has a good knowledge of the classics, astronomy, mathematics moral and natural philosophy, and his conduct equally modest and polite, yet he is an Indian, and the most stupid and illiterate white man will disdain and triumph over this worthy individual. It is disgusting to enter the house of a white man and be stared at full face in inquisitive ignorance..

Typical of the Iroquoian type of town was the village of the Nottoway, which William Byrd visited in 1728. A strong palisade, about 10 feet high, surrounded a quadrangle dotted with long communal 'cabins . . . arched at the top, and covered with bark.' Inside there was no furniture except 'hurdles' for repose. The fortification served as a place of refuge for members of the tribe living in outlying districts.