Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Deborah Isemingers Family Tree (Genealogy Site)

ORIGINS

Home
Deborah
Thanks & Credit
Brief Family History
Photos
Lines
Dingee/Garland
PRICE FAMILY
Price
Betty Lou Price
McGrew
Davis
Clement
Jennings / Hill
Barnard
Mayberry
Westerman / Kennedy
Clifford
Stewart
Doolin
Small World
Skipper
SKIPPER FAMILY
Skipper tree leaves
Lost Skippers
Cheroenhaka Tribe
N C Regulators
Quick
Odom
Snead
King
BASSETT FAMILY
Bassett Info
William & Bertha Belle
Stephen & Wanda
Charles & Mary
Able
ISEMINGER FAMILY
Continued
Iseminger
Iseminger Info
Johnston
Hain
LeClear
Greybeal
Storm/Sturm
Nollert/Kessler
Stemple/Ebbert
Gah
Jennings
Cutter/Riggs
Strong
Thomas Cushman's
Robert Cushman
John Howland
Elizabeth Tilley
Isaac Allerton
Mayflower
Mayflower line
Plymouth
Baldwin
Bassetts of Blore
Beresford
Alsop
Welles/Bryant
Kinge
Fulford
Mather
Ford - Deane
Clare
Mandeville
Woodward - Molyneaux
Bond
Briwere - Vaux
Fortescue
Beauchchamp
Mohun
Toeni
Barker -Calverhall
ORIGINS
Native Americans
Wales
Germany
German Names
Rhine Neckar Area
Scottland
Scottland Clanns
Ireland
Irish Clans
English Names

~~All that is essential for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing~~

Rose, Small

MAP

BERTIE CO. MAP

SWAMPS AND CREEKS

KEN LINDSEYS MAPS

Ancient Origins

According to Irish tradition, the ancient kings of Ireland were the descendants of King Milesius of Spain. Milesius was the grandson of Breoghan, conqueror of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, who was also called Brigus or Brian. Milesius achieved outstanding military success in Egypt, and was given Scota, the Pharoah's daughter, in marriage. When Spain underwent a twenty-six year famine, Milesius sent his uncle Ithe to seek a new homeland, in accordance with an ancient prophecy. After Ithe discovered Ireland, only to be murdered by the resident Tuatha de Danan, his son Lughaide brought his body home to Spain.

In vengeance, Milesius sent his eight sons with a great fleet to conquer the lush green isle. Along the way, a vicious storm claimed the lives of five of the sons, including Ir, whose son Heber-Donn survived. Landing on the island in 1699 BC, the remaining three sons, Heremon, Heber, and Amergin, slew the Danan kings with the aid of Heber-Donn. Heber and Heremon divided the land between them and ruled as joint kings, calling the land 'Scotia', after their mother, and giving lands to Lughaide and Heber-Donn.

However, after only one year, a disagreement between their ambitious wives sparked a war between the brothers; Heremon slew Heber and then the childless Amergin and became sole king of Ireland. Tradition dictates that almost all the ancient kings of Ireland descended from Heremon, Heber, Ir and Ithe.

Among these royal descendants were several famous kings. These include Conn of the Hundred Battles, who was so called due to the hundreds of military victories he achieved during his lengthy 2nd century reign, which ended when he was assassinated by fifty thugs disguised as women. The Three Collas were brothers who were banished from Ireland in the 4th century after being usurped as monarchs by the son of the uncle whom they had previously overthrown. Exiled to Scotland for thirty years before their eventual pardon, they took the name 'Scotia' with them, transferring it to that land. Ireland was subsequently renamed in honor of Ir, brother of Heber and Heremon.

Later in that century, Ireland was ruled by King Niall of the Nine Hostages, whose military exploits are said to have made those of King Arthur pale by comparison. Defeating the Romans in Gaul and Britain, he prevented a Roman conquest of Ireland and gained his name from his habit of taking important captives from each of the nine nations he conquered during his career. In the 5th century, Laeghaire MacNiall became the first Christian Monarch of Ireland.

The most celebrated of all Irish kings was Brian Boru, who tradition credits with the introduction of hereditary surnames to Ireland. He deposed Malachi II as Monarch of all Ireland in 1002 AD, though the succession was amicable and Brian retained Malachi II as a valuable ally. In 1014, the Danes, who already controlled all of England and parts of Ireland, challenged Brian Boru for the leadership of Ireland. Fielding an army composed of forces from the provinces of Munster and Connacht, Brian Boru led the Irish to a decisive victory over the Danes and their allies, permanently ending the Danes' dreams of establishing their supremacy in Ireland. However, Brian Boru was slain in battle, at the age of 88. Malachi II re-ascended the throne, where he ruled as what many consider to have been the last absolute Monarch of all Ireland. After his death, the various provincial kings descended into endless quarreling amongst themselves in futile hopes of ruling the entire nation.